Why daydreaming works for your career

How structured daydreaming can help you get ahead in life

I was a pretty good kid in school, but there were two things I would occasionally get report card checks for: talking and daydreaming. The latter one was especially pronounced in third grade with a teacher I absolutely could not stand. She did horrible things like twist your earlobe if you couldn’t answer a multiplication question correctly.

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Structured daydreaming (focusing on real-life goals that could very well happen in the coming months) could leave you feeling driven and optimistic about your future.

When daydreaming hurts and helps

Daydreaming can look to others as though you are ignoring them. They’re not wrong. But in its defense, daydreaming has some perks that creative writers, entrepreneurs and other dream seekers are familiar with.

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Making daydreaming work for your mind and body

Oscar-winning actress Viola Davis said it best with her take on dreams: “I think sometimes you have to see a physical manifestation of your dream. Otherwise you have to hope, pray and try to conjure something in your mind to feel like it’s possible.”

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Written by

This writer/editor (since 2005), dog owner (22 yrs) and dog caregiver (1 yr) publishes Doggone World, Homegrown, I Do See Color, Tickled and We Need to Talk.

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