The rise of ghost kitchens and not so ‘fast’ food

Mobile apps and anonymous chefs changing how food is made and delivered

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Photo credit: Create Her Stock

Does fast food need to be “fast”?

If you’ve been through a drive-thru recently, it’s not your imagination. The wait time is getting slower. According to QSR Magazine, some of the most popular restaurants are experiencing their slowest speeds in history:

  • Burger King at 198.48 seconds
  • McDonald’s at 189.49 seconds
  • Taco Bell at 158.03 seconds
  • Wendy’s at 133.63 seconds
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White Castle sells Impossible vegan burgers through GrubHub. (Photo credit: Shamontiel L. Vaughn)

Are waitresses becoming extinct?

There’s no debate about whether technology has changed the face of the employment industry. The tech industry has become the go-to job, with labor-intensive jobs lagging behind. Artificial intelligence is even challenging jobs in the legal industry, such as paralegals and lawyers themselves.

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Restaurant jobs are still hiring, believe it or not. (Photo credit: Create Her Stock)
  • 35 percent are ambivalent about cooking
  • only 15 percent said they love to cook

The appearance of ghost kitchens

But if food delivery companies are creating a bridge between hungry consumers who want to stay home and restaurants who need to make a profit, why are restaurants doing so well? One reason could be the rise in ghost kitchens.

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Skip the restaurant, buy the pizza online. (Photo credit: Pixabay)
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Check out her five Medium publications: Doggone World, Homegrown, I Do See Color, Tickled and We Need to Talk. Visit Shamontiel.com to read about her.

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