It’s possible. I often find that white people will claim that “one black friend” whenever something racially charged comes up. But in everyday conversation when it’s not about race, you hear nothing about this person. I claim my friends 365 days a year. As much as social media tells a different story, you can usually tell who someone’s real friends are by who they post. If I see an Instagram/Facebook account full of people who only look like a mirror image of that person, I have my answer.

My photo albums (and former Facebook and Instagram accounts before I closed them) look like you could just throw dice at a globe and there’s a person from that group, especially during college and 2017 to 2019 when I was heavy into storytelling hosting. But again, people create their own social circle. In a predominantly black neighborhood growing up, I could’ve easily had only black friends. I made the choice — with my parents’ two cents — to learn about other groups and befriend them. A high school and college minor in Spanish certainly influenced that. And as an adult, that sticks. It’s one of the primary reasons I joined Toastmasters in the first place: to meet people who aren’t carbon copies of me.

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Check out her five Medium publications: Doggone World, Homegrown, I Do See Color, Tickled and We Need to Talk. Visit Shamontiel.com to read about her.

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